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Native American Removal From Georgia

| Lesson Plans | Unit Information

Lesson 1

Lesson Plan:  Important people of the Creek and Cherokees nations of the late 1700s and early 1800s.  Alexander McGillivray, William McIntosh, Sequoyah, John Ross

Goal: The goal of this lesson is to introduce the lives of
Alexander McGillivray, William McIntosh, Sequoyah, and John Ross and for students to learn why these people are of historical importance and for what students are about to beginning to study. 

 

NCSS Theme: Time, Continuity, and Change


Performance Expectation: Students are expected to gain knowledge and understanding of the lives of
Alexander McGillivray, William McIntosh, Sequoyah, and John Ross and become an expert on the life of one of these people and teach their fellow classmates about their person.


State standard: The following is the state standard for this lesson:

SS8H5 The student will explain significant factors that affected the development of Georgia as part of the growth of the United States between 1789 and 1840.
d. Analyze the events that led to the removal of Creeks and Cherokees; include the roles of Alexander McGillivray, William McIntosh, Sequoyah, John Ross, Dahlonega Gold Rush, Worcester v. Georgia, Andrew Jackson, John Marshall, and the Trail of Tears


Curriculum Connection: Language Arts

Grade Level 8th


Time: 60 mins


Instructional Method:  Discovery (Inquiry)

OBJECTIVE:
Students will create a presentation on their person with at least 85% accuracy. (Synethesis)

MATERIALS:

Biographies, worksheet, rubric, teacher computer with LCD projector, BrainPop access,

PROCEDURE: Beginning, middle, and step-by-step details


1) The teacher will tell students that today our goal is to learn about some of the i
mportant people of the Creek and Cherokees nations of the late 1700s and early 1800s, Alexander McGillivray, William McIntosh, Sequoyah, John Ross.

 

2) Then the teacher will tell the students that before we learn about these people, we are going to review what we already know about Native American tribes.  Ask students if they want to share what they already know about Native American tribes. Call on students to share their answers.

 

3) Then the teacher will show the BrainPop on American Indians on the LCD projector.

 

4) After the video, ask students what tribes lived in Georgia.  Call on students to give their answers.

 

5) Then tell students that they are going to begin research on certain important people of the Creek and Cherokees nations of the late 1700s and early 1800s and then they are going to teach their classmates what they learn. 

 

6) Divide students into groups of 4.  Give each group the name of their person, the biography of that person, and the rubric.

 

7) After groups have finished, count off 1, 2, 3, 4, 1,2,3,4, and so on going from group to group until every student has a number.  Then have all of the ones go together, all of twos go together, etc.

 

8) Then tell students to go around to one another and share their information to teach their classmates about their person.  As students are doing this, the teacher is walking about and grading students based on the rubric.

 

9)  Once everyone is done, ask students if there was anything that they found surprising today or what was the most interesting thing that they learn.  Call on students to give their answers and collect worksheets.

 

Assessment:

Students will be graded based on the rubric for their presentation.


Scoring Rubric: 

See Important people of the Creek and Cherokees nations of the late 1700s and early 1800s worksheet and rubric

ADAPTATIONS/EXTENSIONS:
Adjustment Plan – As an adjustment for this lesson, I would give students an easier reading level biography or have students have a partner in each new group so that two people are presenting the information about the person. 
Enhancement Plan – As an enhancement plan for this lesson, I would have students compare and contrast the lives of two people that they learned about today.

 

Important People of the Creek and Cherokees Nations Worksheet

Important People of the Creek and Cherokee Nations - late1700s and early 1800s Rubric

Biographies

Lesson 2

Lesson Plan: Dahlonega Gold Rush

Goal: The goal of this lesson is for students to not only get an understanding of the Dahlonega Gold Rush but to lay the foundation for learning about the Trail of Tears.

 

NCSS Theme: Time, Continuity, and Change


Performance Expectation: Students are expected to gain knowledge and understanding of the Dahlonega Gold Rush and its effects and create a PowerPoint presentation.


State standard: The following is the state standard for this lesson:

SS8H5 The student will explain significant factors that affected the development of Georgia as part of the growth of the United States between 1789 and 1840.
d. Analyze the events that led to the removal of Creeks and Cherokees; include the roles of Alexander McGillivray, William McIntosh, Sequoyah, John Ross, Dahlonega Gold Rush, Worcester v. Georgia, Andrew Jackson, John Marshall, and the Trail of Tears


Curriculum Connection: Math

Grade Level 8th


Time: 90 mins


Instructional Method:  Discovery (Inquiry)

OBJECTIVE:
Students will create a PowerPoint presentation on the Dahlonega Gold Rush with 85% accuracy. (Synethesis)

MATERIALS:

Map of Georgia, computers, PowerPoint, internet access, projector

PROCEDURE: Beginning, middle, and step-by-step details


1) The teacher will ask students if they ever heard of a gold rush happening and if so, where and when. The teacher will call on students to share their answers.

 

2) Then the teacher will tell students what a gold rush is and tell students that if a gold rush happens somewhere, it impacts that area in many ways.  The teacher will ask students if they have any guesses on the impacts of a gold rush.  The teacher will call on students to give their guesses and record their answers on the board.

 

3) If not said before by a student, tell students that there was a big gold rush that happened here in Dahlonega, Georgia in the 1829.  Ask students if they know where Dahlonega and can find it on a map of Georgia.  Have a student show the class where Dahlonega is.

 

4) Then tell the class that they will be researching and creating a PowerPoint they will share with the class on the Dahlonega Gold Rush.

 

5) Divide students into groups of three and give them the Dahlonega Gold Rush Sheet and Rubric.  The teacher will review the requirements with the class and ask if there are any questions with what they are expected to do.  If there are not any questions, have students begin their PowerPoint

 

6) The teacher will help groups as needed.

 

7) Groups will present their PowerPoint presentation to the class using the LCD projector.

 

8) After all groups have presented their PowerPoint presentations, the teacher will ask the class who would like to name three things that they have learned about the Dahlonega Gold Rush and all students to give their answers.

 

Assessment:

Students will be graded based on the rubric for their PowerPoint.


Scoring Rubric: 

See Dahlonega Gold Rush Activity Sheet and Rubric

ADAPTATIONS/EXTENSIONS:
Adjustment Plan – Students would already know how to use PowerPoint but I would review how to create a presentation for students that need it.  I would adjust this lesson for ELL students by printing off the websites and underlining words that they might have trouble with.  That way ELL students would know what words might be confusing and be able to write on it. 
Enhancement Plan – As an enhancement and enrichment for this lesson, I would have students compare the
Dahlonega Gold Rush to the California Gold Rush of 1849.  

Dahlonega Gold Rush Activity Sheet and Rubric

Lesson 3
 

Lesson Plan:  Worcester v. Georgia


Goal: The goal of this lesson is for students to learn about the
Worcester v. Georgia trial and connect this court case with growing tension with Native Americans living in Georgia.

 

NCSS Theme: Time, Continuity, and Change


Performance Expectation: Students are expected to gain knowledge and understanding of the Worcester v. Georgia
trial and students will see that tensions with Native Americans are increasing and the reasons for this increase.


State standard: The following is the state standard for this lesson:

SS8H5 The student will explain significant factors that affected the development of Georgia as part of the growth of the United States between 1789 and 1840.
d. Analyze the events that led to the removal of Creeks and Cherokees; include the roles of Alexander McGillivray, William McIntosh, Sequoyah, John Ross, Dahlonega Gold Rush, Worcester v. Georgia, Andrew Jackson, John Marshall, and the Trail of Tears


Curriculum Connection: Art

Grade Level 8th


Time: 90 mins


Instructional Method:  Discovery (Inquiry)

OBJECTIVE:
Students will complete the worksheet with at least 85% accuracy. (Comprehension).

Students will defend a point of the Worcester v. Georgia trial with at least 85% accuracy. (Evaluation)

MATERIALS:

Articles, worksheet, rubric, markers, poster board


PROCEDURE: Beginning, middle, and step-by-step details


1) The teacher will ask students if anyone would like to share some of the effects of the
Dahlonega Gold Rush.  Call on students to give their answers and if not mention by students, lead the discussion towards the impacts of the Gold Rush on Native Americans and the tensions it created.

 

2) Tell students that we are going to learning about something else that caused tension between Native Americans and the other residents of Georgia in the 1800s by looking at a famous court case called Worcester v. Georgia

 

3) Ask students if they know anything from just the title of the court case.  Call on students to give their answers.  Lead students to say that the case involves the state of Georgia and someone named Worcester. 

 

4) Then ask students if they have any guesses on what the case might be about since we already know that it has something to do with Native Americans.

 

4) Tell students that today they will be researching the case and answering questions about the case and then they will decide which side they would be in favor of and then create a poster supporting their side.

 

5) Pass out worksheets and rubric. Go over the rubric with the class.

 

6) Divide students into groups of three and pass out articles about the case, markers, and poster board and tell students to begin.

 

7)  After students are finished, have students present their posters to the class and then collect worksheets and posters.

 

8) The teacher will tell students that based on the Dahlonega Gold Rush and now the Worcester v. Georgia, what do you think will happen next?  Any ideas?  Call on students to give their answers.

 

9) Then tell students that tomorrow we are going to be learning about what did happen next because of this tension and it is called Trail of Tears.

 

Assessment:

Students will be graded based on the rubric for their worksheet and poster.


Scoring Rubric: 

See Poster rubric

ADAPTATIONS/EXTENSIONS:
Adjustment Plan – As an adjustment for this lesson, I would make sure that certain ELL students write their posters in their native language, which I would have translated, and then they would have to try to write they were saying on the back of the poster in English.  I would also shorten the number of requirements for the poster and the reading to key points. 

Enhancement Plan – As an enhancement plan for this lesson, I would have students do a mock trial for this case and then vote as a class on what our decision would be.

Worcester Worksheet

Worcester v. Georgia Poster Rubric

Worcester Readings

Lesson 4
 

Lesson Plan: Trail of Tears

Goal: The goal of this lesson is for students to understand what life was like on the Trail of Tears for Native Americans.

 

NCSS Theme: Time, Continuity, and Change


Performance Expectation: Students are expected to gain knowledge and understanding of the Trail of Tears and its effects and create a newspaper article.


State Standard: The following is the state standard for this lesson:

SS8H5 The student will explain significant factors that affected the development of Georgia as part of the growth of the United States between 1789 and 1840.
d. Analyze the events that led to the removal of Creeks and Cherokees; include the roles of Alexander McGillivray, William McIntosh, Sequoyah, John Ross, Dahlonega Gold Rush, Worcester v. Georgia, Andrew Jackson, John Marshall, and the Trail of Tears


Curriculum Connection: Math and Language Arts

Grade Level 8th


Time: 2 Days - 200 mins


Instructional Method:  Discovery (Inquiry)

OBJECTIVE:
Students will create a newspaper article on the Trail of Tears with 85% accuracy. (Synethesis)

MATERIALS:

Computers, The Tree That owns Itself and Other Adventure Tales From out of the Past, Publisher, Article worksheet and rubric, readings, LCD, internet

PROCEDURE: Beginning, middle, and step-by-step details


1)  The teacher will ask students to close their eyes and imagine that someone forced them and their family to move to a new place far from where they live, leaving all possessions behind.  Think about how you would feel.  Give students a couple of minutes to think about it and then have students open their eyes and share their feelings if they would like.

 

2)  Tell students that this in what happen to the Native American people in Georgia and other states 1838 in something called the Trail of Tears. Say that today we are going to be learning about the Trail of Tears.

3) The teacher will read to students “Cherokee Tears” from the book The Tree That owns Itself and Other Adventure Tales From out of the Past. 

 

4) The teacher will ask students how the story makes them feel? What did you like about the story?  How did hearing about the Ross family make you feel?

 

5) Then the teacher will ask students if they think that they know any reason that lead to the Trail of Tears happening.  Call on students to give their answers.  Make sure the Dahlonega Gold Rush and Worcester v. Georgia are talked about.

 

6) Tell students that today with a partner they are going to research more about the Trail of Tears and then prepare an article for John Payne’s newspaper about the Trail of Tears in Microsoft Publisher.

 

7) Have students select a partner and pass out readings, worksheet, and rubric. Go over rubric with students. 

 

8) Have students begin their work.

 

9) Once they have prepared their articles, have students read their articles and discuss with the class how the Trail of Tears made them feel and what we can learn from it.

 

10) Using the LCD projector, show students the painting of what life was like on the Trail at http://www.ngeorgia.com/history/nghisttt.html and ask students what they see in the picture, and if this was how they imagine the Trail of Tears being and how it compares to what they already learned about the Trail of Tears.

 

11) Collect students’ article.

 

 

Assessment:

Students will be graded based on the rubric for their newspaper article.


Scoring Rubric: 

See attached newspaper rubric.

ADAPTATIONS/EXTENSIONS:
Adjustment Plan – For certain students I would shorten this reading and add definitions to the hard words in the reading.  I would have ELL students who have trouble to instead of writing an article to write seven key points of the Trail of Tears.
Enhancement Plan – As an enhancement and enrichment for this lesson, I would have students put their articles together with graphics and create a newspaper that I would print off and post.

Trail of Tears Newspaper Article Worksheet

Trail of Tears Rubric

Trail of Tears Reading

Lesson 5
 

Lesson Plan: Timeline Of Native American Removal From Georgia

Goal: The goal of this lesson is for students to understand more about the removal of the Native Americans from Georgia and the Trail Of Tears.

 

NCSS Theme: Time, Continuity, and Change


Performance Expectation: Students are expected to gain knowledge and understanding of Native American removal from Georgia and the Trail of Tears and create a 3-D timeline of it.


State Standard: The following is the state standard for this lesson:

SS8H5 The student will explain significant factors that affected the development of Georgia as part of the growth of the United States between 1789 and 1840.
d. Analyze the events that led to the removal of Creeks and Cherokees; include the roles of Alexander McGillivray, William McIntosh, Sequoyah, John Ross, Dahlonega Gold Rush, Worcester v. Georgia, Andrew Jackson, John Marshall, and the Trail of Tears


Curriculum Connection: Math and Language Arts

Grade Level 8th


Time: 100 mins


Instructional Method:  Discovery (Inquiry)

OBJECTIVE:
Students will create a 3-D timeline on the Native American removal from Georgia and the Trail of Tears with 85% accuracy. (Synethesis)

MATERIALS:

Computers, Timeline worksheet and rubric, markers, different colored paper, scissors, glue

PROCEDURE: Beginning, middle, and step-by-step details


1)  The teacher will ask students what was the most interesting thing that they learned about the Trail of Tears from the last class.  Call on students to give their answers.  Ask students to describe the hardship that Native Americans faced on the Trail of Tears and what their life was like.  Ask students what they feel is the saddest part of the Trail of Tears.  Call on students to give your answers.

 

2) Tell students that today we are going to be creating a 3-D timeline on the removal of the Creek and Cherokee from Georgia.  On your timeline, you must include at least 15 key events or days that led up to or was a part of the removal.  You must include at least one entry of all of the following people or events: Alexander McGillivray, William McIntosh, Sequoyah, John Ross, Dahlonega Gold Rush, Worcester v. Georgia, Andrew Jackson, John Marshall, and the Trail of Tears.

 

3) Tell students that they need to have at least four 3-D objects on their timelines, such as a cut out of a person or a symbol of an event.

 

4) Divide students into groups of two and pass out rubric.  Go over rubric with students and answer any questions that they have with the assignment.  Tell students that they may use their past assignments, readings, or the internet to come up with their events and ideas for their 3-D pictures.

 

5)  Pass out paper, scissors, glue, and markers to each group.

 

6) Once everyone is done, have each group present their timelines and then discuss common events in students’ different timelines and unique features of the different timelines.

 

Assessment:

Students will be graded based on the rubric for their timeline.


Scoring Rubric: 

See attached newspaper rubric.

ADAPTATIONS/EXTENSIONS:
Adjustment Plan – For an adjustment of this lesson, I would have the events already written for students but mixed up and students would have to sort them into chronicalic order and then add their own images.
Enhancement Plan – As an enhancement and enrichment for this lesson, I would place a timeline around the room and give each group two events that they must figure out where those events would go on the timeline and then we would go over the timeline and see if everyone was correct.

Timeline Of Native American Removal From Georgia Rubric